The Point Reyes National Seashore area encompasses 71,028-acres along a well defined peninsula in Marin County. It’s wild coastal beaches, headlands, estuaries, and uplands contain a wide variety of interesting places to see and explore.

Crossing over the Inverness Ridge and heading towards the Point Reyes headlands, visitors to the National Park leave behind the evergreen forests and enter an area of treeless coastal grasslands that make up the park’s pastoral zone. Ranching on the Point Reyes Peninsula dates back more than 150 years, with a rich history of successive land ownership.

Crossing over the Inverness Ridge and heading towards the Point Reyes headlands, visitors to the National Park leave behind the evergreen forests and enter an area of treeless coastal grasslands that make up the park’s pastoral zone. Ranching on the Point Reyes Peninsula dates back more than 150 years, with a rich history of successive land ownership. These two bulls obviously had a beef with each other.

The entrance way to the KPH Point Reyes Receiving Station. The Monterey cypress “tree tunnel” is a signature landscape feature that evokes some of the prestige that RCA placed in this profitable, historic operation.

The entrance way to the KPH Point Reyes Receiving Station. The Monterey cypress “tree tunnel” is a signature landscape feature that evokes some of the prestige that RCA placed in this profitable, historic operation.

The building can be seen at the end of the "tunnel." Built in 1919, it is now used by the National Park Service as an office, but still houses Amateur Radio Station K6KPH. Over the years, the facility was owned by Marconi, RCA, GE, AT&T and MCI. Decommissioned in 1997, it is now an historical site within the Point Reyes National Seashore.

The building can be seen at the end of the “tree tunnel.” Built in 1919, it is now used by the National Park Service as an office, but still houses Amateur Radio Station K6KPH. Over the years, the facility was owned by Marconi, RCA, GE, AT&T and MCI. Decommissioned in 1997, it is now an historical site within the Point Reyes National Seashore.

The Point Reyes peninsula is a well defined area, geologically separated from the rest of Marin County and almost all of the continental United States by a rift zone of the San Andreas Fault, about half of which is sunk below sea level and forms Tomales Bay.

The Point Reyes peninsula is a well defined area, geologically separated from the rest of Marin County and almost all of the continental United States by a rift zone of the San Andreas Fault, about half of which is sunk below sea level and forms Tomales Bay.

Point Reyes is the windiest place on the Pacific Coast and the second foggiest place on the North American continent. Weeks of fog, especially during the summer months, frequently reduce visibility to hundreds of feet. The Point Reyes Headlands, which jut 10 miles out to sea, pose a threat to each ship entering or leaving San Francisco Bay.

Point Reyes is the windiest place on the Pacific Coast and the second foggiest place on the North American continent. Weeks of fog, especially during the summer months, frequently reduce visibility to hundreds of feet. The Point Reyes Headlands, which jut 10 miles out to sea, pose a threat to each ship entering or leaving San Francisco Bay.

The historic Point Reyes Lighthouse warned mariners of danger for more than a hundred years.

The historic Point Reyes Lighthouse warned mariners of danger for more than a hundred years.

The lighthouse was used as a location for the 1980 John Carpenter film The Fog.

The lighthouse was used as a location for the 1980 John Carpenter film The Fog.

It was built in 1870 and was retired from service in 1975 when the U.S. Coast Guard installed an automated light. They then transferred ownership of the lighthouse to the National Park Service, which has taken on the job of preserving it for future generations to enjoy.

It was built in 1870 and was retired from service in 1975 when the U.S. Coast Guard installed an automated light. They then transferred ownership of the lighthouse to the National Park Service, which has taken on the job of preserving it for future generations to enjoy.

Inside the Point Reyes lighthouse equipment room...

Inside the Point Reyes lighthouse equipment room…

...which exhibits the two 1947 super typhoon foghorns, the air compressors, and a backup power generator that were used at Point Reyes.

…which exhibits the two 1947 super typhoon foghorns, the air compressors, and a backup power generator that were used at Point Reyes.

Another building near the lighthouse.

Another building near the lighthouse.

There she is!

There she is!

The lens in the Point Reyes Lighthouse is a "first order" Fresnel (fray-nel) lens, the largest size of Fresnel lens. The Fresnel lens intensifies the light by bending (or refracting) and magnifying the source light through crystal prisms into concentrated beams. The Point Reyes lens is divided into twenty-four vertical panels, which direct the light into twenty-four individual beams.

The lens in the Point Reyes Lighthouse is a “first order” Fresnel (fray-nel) lens, the largest size of Fresnel lens. The Fresnel lens intensifies the light by bending (or refracting) and magnifying the source light through crystal prisms into concentrated beams. The Point Reyes lens is divided into twenty-four vertical panels, which direct the light into twenty-four individual beams.

A counterweight and gears similar to those in a grandfather clock rotate the 6000-pound lens at a constant speed, one revolution every two minutes. This rotation makes the beams sweep over the ocean surface like the spokes of a wagon wheel, and creates the Point Reyes signature pattern of one flash every five seconds.

A counterweight and gears similar to those in a grandfather clock rotate the 6000-pound lens at a constant speed, one revolution every two minutes. This rotation makes the beams sweep over the ocean surface like the spokes of a wagon wheel, and creates the Point Reyes signature pattern of one flash every five seconds.

Each of the 308 steps you must climb after visiting the Point Reyes Lighthouse are numbered so you can count each one as you make your way back to your car.

Each of the 308 steps you must climb after visiting the Point Reyes Lighthouse are numbered so you can count each one as you make your way back to your car.

11836907_10207250005152227_6098575635942177673_n